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Video counseling

CMH makes room for increased call volume

By Media Coverage, News

Moving appointments to video or phone

As even the most unfazed of citizens have recently found themselves hoarding toilet paper or at least stocking up on food supplies, perusing news articles about the science and spread of COVID-19, and second-guessing any newly developing cough, all while practicing social distancing and facing economic fallout, it is undeniably a time of increased anxiety for most of the world. Now more than ever, mental health professionals find themselves offering support to people with new, developing or existing needs.

Kirsten Mau, director of marketing and communications for the Center for Mental Health, says it has been a busy time for the center at a regional and local level. Kari Commeford director of the Gunnison County Substance Abuse Prevention Program (GCSAPP), said that while her organization has not seen an uptick in calls, the county’s call center has received many inquiries from people stressed by their symptoms and the uncertainty of whether or not they have COVID-19 in the absence of definitive tests. Call center workers have worked to reassure people and encourage them to remain calm. The organizations are both working to remain open and available to all community members as needed, while also pivoting to comply with county-wide health and public safety restrictions on in-person meetings.
“Obviously, our first priority has been seeing clients,” explains Mau. And for those who find themselves in need of a little extra support right now, Same Day Access is for new clients who are not in crisis but want to get started with services.

The center’s CEO, Shelly Spalding, posted an update earlier this week, stating, “We have established an internal COVID-19 Response Team composed of leaders from various areas of our organization to interact effectively with state and local agencies across our six-county region.”

“Given the situation in Gunnison County and Crested Butte, we are moving all appointments to telephone or video so that we can continue to serve our clients even while our physical location is closed. We are outreaching our clients individually on this. We’d like to ensure the community knows how to access crisis services,” Spalding writes.

Commerford offers this advice as well: “It is an interesting time, and we have the opportunity to help shape how it impacts us, especially our kids. It is important to engage in positive experiences with our children – playing board games, playing outdoors, spending family time. Find ways to stay connected while keeping healthy and following the public health orders. Talk on the phone instead of texting. Most important unplug if you can, listening to and watching media right now can perpetuate stress and anxiety.”

Anyone experiencing a mental health crisis can call the Crisis Line at (970) 252-6220, reach out to Colorado Crisis Services at 1-844-493-8255 or text “TALK” to 38255.

Crested Butte News
Written by Katherine Nettles
Crested Butte News | March 18, 2020
 Print or download article
The Center For Mental Health Visits State Capitol To Ask Legislators To Help Increase Access To Behavioral Healthcare

CMH Visits State Capitol for CBHC Annual Lobby Day

By News, Press Release

The Center For Mental Health Visits State Capitol To Ask Legislators To Help Increase Access To Behavioral Healthcare

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Contact
Jackie Brown-Griggs
303-300-2255

Montrose, Colorado – January 15, 2020 – The Center for Mental Health will be at the State Capitol building on Wednesday, January 15, 2020 for Colorado Behavioral Healthcare Council (CBHC) annual Lobby Day at the Capitol. This signature day for CBHC highlights the importance of Colorado’s community behavioral health system which includes The Center for Mental Health. The Center for Mental Health provides critical behavioral health services to the residents of Delta, Gunnison, Hinsdale, Montrose, Ouray, and San Miguel counties. During meetings with legislators, The Center for Mental Health will discuss mental health and substance use disorder needs with the hope of gaining support for local efforts.

This year, the Lobby Day at the Capitol will be focusing on the severe need to strengthen the system’s workforce through increased reimbursement, salaries, and retention strategies such as student loan forgiveness.  Over the past 21 years, community provider inflationary increases have fallen so far behind that providers have lost more than 36.7% of their spending power as compared to the inflation rate across our state. Additionally, compared to state employee salary survey increases, community providers have lagged by 33.5%. As this issue has continued to worsen over the years, it has caused a shortage of behavioral health providers who serve our most vulnerable populations. It is crucial that efforts be taken to close this funding gap.

The Center for Mental Health will also be lobbying to increase opportunities to expand Mental Health First Aid, an eight-hour course which teaches the signs and symptoms of someone in a behavioral health crisis. Proposed legislation would appropriate funding to the Colorado Department of Education to contract for a train-the-trainer program designed to increase behavioral health training opportunities for K-12 educators and faculty. The Center for Mental Health is very pleased that this legislation will be a top priority as the bill, SB20-001, was the first to be introduced in the Senate in 2020.

The Center for Mental Health looks forward to meeting with legislators during the first days of the 2020 legislative session to ensure that Coloradans in our service area can access excellent and affordable behavioral health care. To learn more about the legislative efforts, visit cbhc.org.

The Center for Mental Health is a nonprofit organization seeking to promote mental health and well-being. It provides behavioral healthcare services through more than ten facilities across 10,000 square miles serving the residents of Delta, Gunnison, Hinsdale, Montrose, Ouray, and San Miguel counties. Visit centermh.org to learn more.

Center for Mental Health, Crested Butte

A Valuable Community Resource

By Media Coverage, News

“There was no guilt, no shame, and that’s how mental health should be treated”

“We live in paradise. How could anyone feel depressed here?”

It’s a difficult and extremely personal headspace to understand, recalls 33-year local Ian Hatchett, as so many of us were drawn to this town for its beauty, recreation, culture and community. But living here can also be trying, and isolating if you don’t know who or where to turn. Hatchett experienced this difficulty firsthand, but also found a safe haven with the Center for Mental Health (CMH).

After facing back-to-back heart surgeries in 2018, “I gradually went into a very deep, dark depression,” said Hatchett. “Sometimes life can just stack up against you. It was new terrain for me. I didn’t really understand what was happening to me.”

Even though he had no prior history of depression, Hatchett recalls his struggle. “I didn’t know how to ask for help. I didn’t know how to reach out and felt incredible guilt. I had given up. I had never given up anything ever in my life. Suicide is really disproportionately prevalent in our community and I went very close.”

Fortunately, his friends recognized a need for help and took him to the Center for Mental Health in Gunnison. “We live in a village and my friends realized something was going on. I’m really lucky they were looking after me. They knew.”

Ian speaks highly of his experience with CMH, which now has a new location in Crested Butte. He says, “There’s an amazing level of compassion there and they help people who are in a really bad place. There was no guilt, no shame, and that’s how mental health should be treated.”

The Center for Mental Health provides behavioral health services through more than 10 facilities across the Western Slope and opened a Crested Butte location this summer in collaboration with Gunnison Valley Health.

Rural suicide rates are consistently higher than those in urban areas, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. “We know we live in a rural community and we know there’s a stigma around mental health,” explained Kimberly Behounek, the Center for Mental Health’s regional director for Gunnison and Crested Butte. Unfortunately, Colorado has one of the highest suicide rates in the country and that rate is especially prevalent along the Western Slope, as reported by the Colorado Institute of Health.

This time of year can be particularly tough for people, explained CMH CEO Shelly Spaulding. “Part of the challenge is there are so many images through social media and TV in what the perfect holidays are supposed to look like,” she said. “And for so many people the perfect holiday is not their actual experience and that adds to any emotional turmoil they might be experiencing.” Financial stress at the end of the year, and shorter and darker winter days are also factors that can contribute, she said.

However, the new CMH Crested Butte location is a significant resource to providing the north end of the valley easier access to mental health care. CMH offers a number of mental health services, including peer support, substance use counseling, mental health therapy and medication management. According to Spaulding, the Crested Butte location has seen 223 new patients through November since opening this June.

CMH is currently working on increasing its staff and services to meet the needs of the community. “We are essentially looking to double our capacity for therapy starting in January,” said Behounek.

Behounek commends the professionalism and high skill level of the Crested Butte staff, which includes psychiatric nurse practitioner Laura Rogers, who worked previously at the Gunnison location. “There’s not another licensed nurse like her in the Crested Butte community,” said Behounek. “Having Laura in-person year-round has been tremendous for our community.”

Hatchett praises the team as well. “The people who work there are full of compassion and it’s a very welcoming place. I was connected with a brilliant therapist who was very smart and very funny. They made a really big effort to customize their therapeutic tools to fit me. There was a deep commitment from [my therapist] to get me up and keep going.”

Part-time Crested Butte resident and philanthropist Paul Uhl connected with the CMH after experiencing tragedy when his son Kyle died by suicide in October 2018. Uhl said being able to talk about it was not only therapeutic, but he was also motivated to help contribute to the opening of the Crested Butte location and help those in need of affordable mental health care.

During Kyle’s celebration of life, Uhl’s family and friends raised close to $12,000 for the CMH, specifically to help patients who can’t afford mental health care. Through fundraising, the CMH strives to provide services free of charge if a patient does not have health insurance.

Uhl also spearheads CMH’s Trek for Life, an annual fundraiser event in memory of Kyle to raise suicide awareness and prevention. The event follows one of Kyle’s favorite hikes from Crested Butte over West Maroon Pass. This year’s September event raised almost $20,000 for CMH and individuals in the Crested Butte community who don’t have insurance or cannot afford mental health care.

Uhl hopes to expand the 2020 Trek for Life into a two-day event, with one day for the hike and the second day being a community event in town. “We really want to reach out the Crested Butte community more effectively,” said Uhl. “We want to be able to help those individuals in the community here who really need it and would benefit from this.”

There were four suicides in Crested Butte in 2018, and the CMH hopes to avoid this tragedy affecting the community in the future. This year, the CMH also opened a Crisis Walk-In Center in Montrose, which provides urgent help 24 hours a day, 365 days a year. “In the last four months we’ve seen more than 100 people come over for services in the walk-in clinic,” said Spaulding. “If you have a friend or a loved one who you’re worried about, you can always reach out and talk to someone. I don’t want people to feel like they’re alone.”

“A lot of people come here to go skiing or hiking or biking and enjoy the outdoors, but there’s a chasm between the people who live and work here and those who come here to recreate,” said Uhl. “I hope we can build awareness and help people get through the difficult times. We have a long way to go but I’m encouraged by what’s been accomplished since the CMH has been open these past six months. The more we get people talking about it, I think we can help.”

“There’s a community resource right here for mental health,” Hatchett emphasized. “If you’ve got a problem with your car, you take it to the mechanic. If you’ve got a toothache, you go to the dentist. It shouldn’t be any different with mental health. I hope we as a community can keep our eyes open to friends showing signs of depression and withdrawal. This town really rallied around me. Because of them, I’m back and a contributing member of our beautiful community.”

Take care of one another. If you, a friend or loved one is in need of help, contact the Center for Mental Health by phone (970) 252-6220, or text “talk” to 38255 to connect with a national crisis counselor. The Center for Mental Health in Crested Butte at 214 Sixth St., Suite 4 is open Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. (closed for lunch from 1 to 2 p.m.). The Montrose Crisis Walk-In Center provides urgent help 24 hours a day, 365 days a year. No insurance is needed. GVH’s peer support specialist program has also been expanded to 24-hour, seven days a week service.

Crested Butte News
Written by Kendra Walker
Crested Butte News | December 18, 2019
 Print or download article
Depression Help

CMH Helping Combat Depression and Anxiety Over The Holidays

By News, Press Release

The Center for Mental Health Committed to Helping Our Communities Combat Depression and Anxiety Over the Holidays

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Contact
Jackie Brown-Griggs
303-300-2255

Montrose, Colorado — December 17, 2019 — With the holidays in full swing, The Center for Mental Health (CMH) wants to inform and remind the community of the local behavioral resources available. These resources are especially critical if someone on the Western Slope is feeling hopeless or having suicidal thoughts, or knows of someone who is. CMH recently expanded behavioral healthcare offerings across the region, so finding urgent mental health care is easier than ever before.

Although the holidays are promoted as a time for family and fun, not everyone feels festive. In fact, the holidays are a time when depression and sadness can really set in. “We recognize that this is the time of year when people can feel increasingly isolated and alone,” said Shelly J. Spalding, CEO of The Center for Mental Health. “We have expanded our care on the Western Slope in the effort to helping those who need counseling or crisis services this time of year.”

To better serve their six-county service area, CMH opened new locations in Telluride and Crested Butte, and a brand new Crisis Walk-In Center (CWC) in Montrose. Services have been expanded in several of CMH’s Western Slope locations to meet the needs of the community. “Our Crisis Walk-In Center is open every day, including Christmas. Anyone, of any age may walk in if they feel in danger of hurting themselves or others, or just can’t cope and don’t know where to turn” said Amanda Jones, Chief Clinical Officer. “When we opened our Crisis Walk-in Center in September, we had a number of local teens who needed support to cope with suicidal thoughts and other crises. We are a safe place, close to home, where they can be treated with their family during a difficult time,” said Jones.

Unfortunately, suicide has impacted almost everyone at some time in their life. It maybe the loss of a close friend or family member, a member of the community, or even hearing about it on the news. At times, we may worry that someone we know and love might be in danger of hurting themselves. So, in addition to offering urgent care for those in crisis, CMH provides classes in Mental Health First Aid and suicide prevention strategies such as Applied Suicide Intervention Skills Training (ASIST) and Question Persuade and Refer (QPR) so people can recognize danger signs and have tools to help others.

“I wasn’t on anyone’s radar,” said Ian Hatchett of Crested Butte. “I was happy, engaged in my social circles, and employed in a career as a mountain guide. Then, I experienced the perfect storm of personal issues that led me down a dangerous path. If it weren’t for the combination of my friends, my therapist, and The Center for Mental Health, I simply wouldn’t be here today. I will do anything in my power to share my experience in the hopes that I can make a difference in someone’s life.”

Hatchett isn’t alone, in fact, suicide rates nationally are on the rise. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), suicides are the leading cause of death among individuals between the ages of 10 and 34 and the fourth leading cause of death among adults 35 to 54 years old. In fact, there were more than twice as many suicides (47,173) in the United States as there were homicides (19,510) in 2018. Unfortunately, Colorado’s Western Slope has higher suicide rates than Colorado’s more urban areas. This is consistent with the situation in rural communities across the country.

According to the Colorado Institute of Health, Colorado has one of the highest suicide rates in the country, and that rate is especially prevalent in the state’s southwestern corner and the Western Slope. “We know that as a rural area, we need to be on higher alert to those who feel lost and alone,” added Spalding. “We have assembled an esteemed staff of professionals who know what to look for and who understand how to treat someone who is feeling hopeless,” said Kimberly Behounek, The Center’s Regional Director for Gunnison and Crested Butte.

“I had reached my lowest point and had given up,” added Hatchett. “Luckily, my therapist at CMH had the right suitcase of skills and gave me permission to forgive myself for giving up. As a nation, we need to demystify the process of mental healthcare and break the prejudices around it.” When Hatchett needed help, he traveled to Gunnison to get care. “They didn’t have anything available near me in Crested Butte at the time, but now CMH has an office right here.”

“We recognized that easier access to quality behavioral health is one fundamental and unique challenge that we could address.” said Spalding. “We still have a way to go, but we have made a lot of progress in making mental healthcare more accessible in our community by providing more local providers and new, convenient locations.”
The Center for Mental Health offers the following short list of risk factors associated with the possibility for suicidal behavior:

RISK FACTORS FOR SUICIDE (suicidepreventionlifeline.org)

  • History of mental health issues
  • Alcohol and other substance use and abuse
  • History of trauma or abuse
  • Major physical illnesses
  • Previous suicide attempt(s) or family history of suicide
  • Loss of relationship(s), job, or financial loss
  • Lack of social support and sense of isolation or hopelessness
  • Stigma associated with asking for help
  • Lack of healthcare, especially mental health and substance abuse treatment
  • Local clusters of suicide or exposure to others who have died by suicide (in real life or via the media and Internet)

Knowing the warning signs may help determine if you, a friend, or loved one is at risk for suicide. If so, please call The Center for Mental Health Crisis Line at 970.252.6220 (locally). People can also call Colorado Crisis Services at 1-800-493-TALK (8255) or text “TALK” to 38255 (statewide).

SUICIDE WARNING SIGNS (suicidepreventionlifeline.org)

  • Expressing the desire to die or to kill themselves
  • Researching ways to kill themselves
  • Talking about feeling hopeless, trapped, in pain, or having no reason to live
  • Expressing concern about being a burden to others
  • Behaving recklessly
  • Increasing alcohol and substance use
  • Sleeping too little or too much
  • Withdrawing or isolating themselves
  • Extreme mood swings

The Center for Mental Health provides help by phone, online, or in person:

Phone: If in crisis, please call our 24/7 confidential crisis line at 970.252.6220 or text TALK to 38255 to connect with a crisis counselor.
Online: Using CMH’s confidential, free, and quick self-screening tool, you can assess your mental health situation online.
In-Person: The Center for Mental Health has locations across the Western Slope — you can make an appointment or walk-in for help at centermh.org/locations.

Take a Mental Health First Aid Class: View our calendar of events to find a training class near you.

Crisis Walk-In-Center: The Crisis Walk-in Center in Montrose provides urgent behavioral health to anyone in our region. If you think you or someone you know is in danger of hurting themselves, walk in 24-hours a day, 365 days a year for help. No insurance is needed.

The Center for Mental Health is a nonprofit organization seeking to promote mental health and well-being. It provides behavioral healthcare services through more than ten facilities across 10,000 square miles including Delta, Gunnison, Hinsdale, Montrose, Ouray, and San Miguel Counties. Visit www.centermh.org to learn more.

# # #

Crisis Walk-In Center in Montrose

KJCT8 News: Montrose Crisis Walk-In Center Open for a Month

By Media Coverage, News

It’s been a little over a month since the mental health Crisis Walk-In Center in Montrose opened its doors.

Since it opened on September 16th, staff there say they’ve seen about 30 walk-in patients.

The center offers things like a 24-hour detox facility, and staffed mental health professionals to help anyone going through a mental crisis.

They say a big goal is to take pressure off of local emergency rooms, after the 24-hour Mind Springs walk-in center closed here in Grand Junction.

“This is something that we didn’t have before, and we feel pretty promising about what we are able to offer. Because, these services, what our hope is, is it would’ve prevented someone from not getting care, or going to a hospital level of care,” said Chief Clinical Officer, Amanda Jones.

Officials say weekends are when the walk-in clinic is usually the busiest.

The Center for Mental Health, Crested Butte

The Center for Mental Health Committed to Curbing Suicide on Western Slope

By News, Press Release

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Contact
Jackie Brown-Griggs
303-300-2255

Montrose, Colorado — October 9, 2019 — As September’s Suicide Prevention Awareness month is behind us and we head into the holiday season, The Center for Mental Health (CMH) wants to continue to make the community aware of the local behavioral resources available. These are especially critical if someone is having suicidal thoughts, or knows of someone who is, and needs intervention or care along the Western Slope. CMH recently expanded mental and behavioral care offerings across the region, so finding a professional who will listen and help is easier than ever before.

“We recognize and know that suicide rates are increasing across our community. While there are several contributing factors, the one thing we can do is increase access to quality behavioral healthcare for those having suicidal thoughts and for family members who are concerned about loved ones,” said Shelly Spalding, CEO of The Center for Mental Health. “We need to communicate with our community about the warning signs and the ways we can help save lives.”

In 2019, CMH opened new locations in Telluride, Crested Butte, and in Montrose with the new Crisis Walk-In Center (CWC) that opened in September. It has expanded services in several of its Western Slope locations to meet the needs of the community. “The newly opened CWC is open all day, every day. Anyone, of any age can walk in if they feel in danger of hurting themselves or others,” said Amanda Jones, Chief Clinical Officer. “In our first few weeks we have already been able to support teens locally experiencing suicidal thoughts. We have given them a safe place, close to home, where they can be treated with their family during a difficult time,” said Jones.

Unfortunately, suicide affects everyone at some time. It maybe the loss of a close friend or family member, a member of the community, or even hearing about it on the news. At times, we may worry that someone we know and love might be in danger of hurting themselves. So, in addition to offering urgent care for those in crisis, CMH provides classes in Mental Health First Aid and suicide prevention strategies such as Applied Suicide Intervention Skills Training (ASIST) and Question Persuade and Refer (QPR) so people can recognize danger signs and have tools to help others.

“I wasn’t on anyone’s radar,” said Ian Hatchett of Crested Butte. “I was happy, engaged in my social circles, and employed in a career I loved as a mountain guide. Then, I experienced the perfect storm of personal issues that led me down a dangerous path. If it weren’t for the combination of my friends, my therapist, and The Center for Mental Health, I simply wouldn’t be here today. I will do anything in my power to share my experience in the hopes that I can make a difference in someone’s life.”

Hatchett isn’t alone, in fact, suicide rates nationally are on the rise. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), suicides are the leading cause of death among individuals between the ages of 10 and 34 and the fourth leading cause of death among adults 35 to 54 years old. In fact, there were more than twice as many suicides (47,173) in the United States as there were homicides (19,510) in 2018. In addition, the Western Slope mirrors the national average of rural suicide rates consistently being higher than those in urban areas.

According to the Colorado Institute of Health, Colorado has one of the highest suicide rates in the country, and that rate is especially prevalent in the state’s southwestern corner and the Western Slope, followed by a handful of eastern plains counties. Experts agree that the combination of geographical isolation, access to guns, limited or lack of mental health care, and the stigma around seeking help each contribute to those increasing suicide rates.

“We know that as a rural area, we need to be on higher alert to those who feel lost and alone. We have an esteemed staff of professionals who know what to look for and who understand how to treat someone who is feeling hopeless,” said Kimberly Behounek, Regional Director for Gunnison and Crested Butte.

“I had reached my lowest point and had given up,” added Hatchett. “Luckily, my therapist at CMH had the right suitcase of skills and gave me permission to forgive myself for giving up. As a nation, we need to demystify the process of mental healthcare and break the prejudices around it.” When Hatchett needed help, he traveled to CMH in Gunnison to get care. “They didn’t have anything available near me in Crested Butte at the time, but now CMH has an office right here.”

“We recognized that easier access to quality behavioral health is one fundamental and unique challenge that we could address.” said Spalding. “We still have a way to go, but we have made a lot of progress in making mental healthcare more accessible in our community by providing more local providers and new, convenient locations.”

The Center for Mental Health offers the following short list of risk factors associated with the possibility for suicidal behavior on their blog at centermh.org/blog:

RISK FACTORS FOR SUICIDE (suicidepreventionlifeline.org)

  • History of mental health issues
  • Alcohol and other substance use and abuse
  • History of trauma or abuse
  • Major physical illnesses
  • Previous suicide attempt(s) or family history of suicide
  • Loss of relationship(s), job, or financial loss
  • Lack of social support and sense of isolation or hopelessness
  • Stigma associated with asking for help
  • Lack of healthcare, especially mental health and substance abuse treatment
  • Local clusters of suicide or exposure to others who have died by suicide (in real life or via the media and Internet)

Knowing the warning signs may help determine if you, a friend, or loved one is at risk for suicide. If so, please call The Center for Mental Health Crisis Line at 970.252.6220 (locally) or Colorado Crisis Services at 1-800-493-TALK (8255) (statewide).

SUICIDE WARNING SIGNS (suicidepreventionlifeline.org)

  • Expressing the desire to die or to kill themselves
  • Researching ways to kill themselves
  • Talking about feeling hopeless, trapped, in pain, or having no reason to live
  • Expressing concern about being a burden to others
  • Behaving recklessly
  • Increasing alcohol and substance use
  • Sleeping too little or too much
  • Withdrawing or isolating themselves
  • Extreme mood swings

The Center for Mental Health can help by phone, online, or in person.

Phone
If you are in crisis, please call our confidential crisis line at 970.252.6220 or text TALK to 38255 to connect with a national crisis counselor.

Online
Using CMH’s confidential, free, and quick self-screening tool, you can assess your mental health situation online.

In person
The Center for Mental Health has locations across the Western Slope — you can make an appointment or walk-in for help at centermh.org/locations.

Take a Mental Health First Class
View our calendar of events to find a training class near you.

Crisis Walk-In-Center
The Crisis Walk-in Center in Montrose provides urgent behavioral health to anyone in our region. If you think you or someone you know is in danger of hurting themselves, walk in 24-hours a day, 365 days a year for help. No insurance is needed.

The Center for Mental Health is a nonprofit organization seeking to promote mental health and well-being. It provides behavioral healthcare services through more than ten facilities across 10,000 square miles including Delta, Gunnison, Hinsdale, Montrose, Ouray, and San Miguel Counties.  Visit centermh.org to learn more.

# # #

KVNF Public Radio

Local Motion: Mental Health Resources

By Media Coverage, News

This edition of Local Motion focuses on mental health.

Many Western Slope residents struggle with depression, anxiety, substance abuse and even thoughts of suicide. The Surgeon General of the U.S. has said that one in four people experiences some form of mental illness, and the rates of those illnesses are highest in the American West. Fortunately, resources ranging from therapists to treatment centers are available in many communities. KVNF’s Jodi Peterson interviews various mental health experts about what assistance is out there.

Listen on KVNF
Crisis Walk-In Center in Montrose

KJCT8 News: Mental health crisis walk-in center open in Montrose

By Media Coverage, News

September 17, 2019 — After Rocky Mountain Health Plans took over the contract for crisis services statewide, with that came the closure of the 24 hour walk-in center at Mind Springs.

Now, there’s a new one in Montrose.

The new Crisis Walk-In Center will offer things like a 24-hour detox facility, and staffed mental health professionals to help anyone going through a mental crisis.

The new place has 11 beds and is the only facility of its kind between Denver and Salt Lake.

Staff at the center say they hope to take some demand off of hospital emergency rooms.

“I think that the ER’s are overrun with so many substance abuse issues going on right now, that if we can take some of those people and get them into our detox and give them the services that they need, you could definitely see a decrease in hospital admissions because of that,” said Director of Nursing and Emergency Services, Heather Thompson.

Crisis services will be available 24 hours a day, and seven days a week.

Courtesy of KJCT8 News | Back to Press Room

Open House at CMH Crisis Walk-in Center in Montrose

CMH Announces Opening of Crisis Walk-In Center this Spring

By News, Press Release

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Contact
Jackie Brown-Griggs
303-300-2255

Montrose, Colorado — March 29, 2019 — This spring, The Center for Mental Health (The Center or CMH) will open a state-of-the-art Crisis Walk-In Center in Montrose that will provide essential crisis behavioral health services to the six counties of Delta, Gunnison, Hinsdale, Montrose, Ouray, and San Miguel. Currently, those services are not available or are available on a limited scale. The Center for Mental Health will work closely with these communities to ensure that their population has access to urgent behavioral healthcare they may need in the most appropriate and effective of settings. All services will be available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week with walk-in availability. On Friday, March 29, a community open-house was held to give the community, first responders, providers and supporters an opportunity to tour the facility prior to opening.

Last year, The Center for Mental Health responded to nearly 3,500 crisis behavioral situations across the region, largely through its mobile crisis support services. These may include everything from a community member experiencing a severe depressive episode to an overdose to a suicide attempt. “Although our mobile services may have been effective in the treatment of those in need of mental health triage, a mobile service certainly cannot meet the current demand effectively,” said Shelly J. Spalding, Chief Executive Officer for The Center for Mental Health. “The Western Slope community is in dire need of a resource where those with behavioral health episodes can get the care they need, close to home.”

Approximately 10,000 square miles, the six-county region has limited access to urgent behavioral health services. Patients in need of mental health and substance-abuse emergency services, oftentimes travel hundreds of miles to Grand Junction, Durango, or Denver to access care. “In many cases, patients from our area travel four to six hours to a larger city to get the urgent care they need,” said Amanda Jones, Chief Clinical Officer. “That’s simply not acceptable and our citizens deserve better.” In addition to putting lives at risk, this distance makes it nearly impossible for families to visit and support their loved ones during recovery. A local facility will positively impact the lives of people seeking behavioral health services in the community and ensure people can access the critical support they need close to home.

The new Crisis Walk-In Center will provide both mental health and substance abuse services. An on-site, no-appointment-needed Walk-In Clinic will offer rapid response care and then provide patients outpatient services once the crisis is stabilized. “We expect to manage 96 percent of all regional behavioral health episodes in Montrose at the Crisis Walk-in Center,” added Spalding. “For anyone who must leave this region for inpatient care, the care we offer in Montrose will serve as pivotal step down from the hospitalization to living and recovering at home with familial and friend support.

The integrated planning team has worked diligently to ensure that the community will have access to this care when needed. “Our goal is to treat anyone who needs care regardless of their ability to pay,” said Kjersten Davis, Chairman of the Board for CMH. “When a person is faced with a behavioral health crisis, that isn’t the time to turn them away because they may not be able to pay. We are working closely with our third-party payers to make sure most insurance providers will support their care.”

Serving all ages, the new Crisis Walk-In Center will treat children and adolescents as well; currently, these services are nonexistent on the Western Slope. “The adolescent population who needs bed-based mental health or substance abuse care are typically sent to the Front Range. As you can well imagine, this creates a significant burden for parents, friends and extended family members to offer support, resulting in extra stress and trauma for everyone,” adds Jones who brings extensive knowledge of mental health care for the adolescent population.

Substance Abuse Withdrawal Management will be another key service provided. Currently, there are very limited bed-based detox services on the Western Slope. Individuals in need of detox services may access the Walk-In Clinic for an assessment. If the on-site medical providers determine that hospitalization isn’t warranted, outpatient detox therapies will be administered where family members and friends are a welcome part of the treatment process.

In addition to serving the overall community, the burden on law enforcement will be significantly reduced. The Crisis Walk-In Center will help reduce the guess work for first responders who are managing people experiencing behavioral health episodes so they can better determine where the patient should be transported. Currently, when first responders come across an individual exhibiting unusual behavior, one of the options is jail, which is not the calmest location when someone is in their most fragile and vulnerable condition. “The staff at The Center has taken great strides in bridging the gap in immediate care and response for our citizens,” said detective Phil Rosty of the Montrose Police Department. “We are currently partnering police officers across the region with mental health professionals to ensure we provide the best service to those in need. As first responders, this resource provides a specialized and valuable resource for our responding officers to utilize while helping those in crisis.”

The Crisis Walk-In Center will employ nearly 30 people; it will have 11-15 inpatient and observation beds, and can treat approximately 16 people at any given time. “After extensive due diligence, we discovered a need for a facility of this kind was dire,” said Kjersten Davis. “After we raised more than $3 million through public and private funding, we were able to create a place where our citizens can access quality mental health services available for people of all ages and walks of life, void of barriers, physical, cultural, or financial.”

The Center for Mental Health is a nonprofit organization seeking to promote mental health and well-being. It provides behavioral health services through sixteen facilities across 10,000 square miles including Delta, Gunnison, Hinsdale, Montrose, Ouray, and San Miguel counties. Visit www.centermh.org to learn more.

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CMH Crisis Walk-in Center in Montrose

CMH Completes the Final Stage in Offering Comprehensive Mental Health in Montrose

By News, Press Release

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Contact
Jackie Brown-Griggs
303-300-2255

Montrose, Colorado — September 16, 2019 — The Center for Mental Health will open its state-of-the-art Crisis Walk-In Center (CWC) to the public on September 16th. Located in Montrose, it will provide essential crisis behavioral healthcare services to the six counties of Delta, Gunnison, Hinsdale, Montrose, Ouray, and San Miguel.

Currently, those services are not available or available only on a limited scale. All crisis services will be available every day, 24 hours a day, 7 days a week with walk-in availability.

“We have been working on funding, planning, building, and staffing this facility for two years at this point. We are thrilled to have crossed the finish line and be 100% ready to serve those in our community who need crisis behavioral services,” said Shelly J. Spalding, Chief Executive Officer. “The final details and approvals from those agencies overseeing our Crisis Walk-in Center gave us a bright, green light to open today.”

The new Crisis Walk-In Center is a critical resource on the Western Slope for those experiencing behavioral health crises. For example, last year, CMH responded to nearly 3,500 crisis situations across the region, largely through its mobile crisis support services. These may include everything from a community member experiencing a severe depressive episode to an overdose to a suicide attempt. “Although our mobile services were effective in the treatment of those in need of mental health triage, a mobile service certainly cannot meet the current demand effectively,” added Spalding. “The Western Slope community was in dire need of a resource offering urgent behavioral healthcare, close to home. Often these folks may end up in an emergency room, or even jail, before getting the treatment they really need. This facility will ensure people can get the right care, faster. This has the potential to save lives and get people into recovery more quickly and with less trauma.”

Approximately 10,000 square miles, the six-county region has limited access to urgent behavioral health services.

Clients in need of mental health and substance-abuse emergency services oftentimes travel hundreds of miles to Grand Junction, Durango, or Denver to access care. “In many cases, patients from our area travel four to six hours to get the urgent care they need,” said Amanda Jones, Chief Clinical Officer. “That’s simply not acceptable and our residents deserve better.” In addition to putting lives at risk, this distance makes it nearly impossible for families to visit and support their loved ones during recovery. The new facility will save lives in our community and promote recovery and healing by ensuring people can access the critical support they need close to home.

The CWC provides both mental health and substance abuse services. An on-site, no-appointment-needed Walk-In Clinic will offer rapid response care and then refer clients for outpatient services once the crisis is stabilized.  “We expect to manage 96 percent of all regional behavioral health episodes in Montrose at the CWC,” said Spalding. “For anyone who must leave this region for inpatient care elsewhere, the care we offer in Montrose will serve as a pivotal step from hospitalization to living and recovering at home with familial and friend support.

The integrated planning team has worked diligently to ensure that everyone in the community will have access to this care if needed. “Our goal is to treat anyone needing care regardless of their ability to pay,” said Kjersten Davis, President of the Board for The Center. “When a person is faced with a behavioral health crisis, that isn’t the time to turn them away because they may not be able to pay. We are working closely with our third-party payers to ensure most insurance providers will support their care.” This location will provide services to any one in our six-county region.  In addition, those from anywhere in the state will also be able to come to our facility in an emergency.

Serving all ages, the new Crisis Walk-In Center will treat children and adolescents as well; currently, these services are nonexistent on the Western Slope. Often, adolescents who need inpatient care are sent to the Front Range for evaluation and care. This creates a significant burden for parents, friends, and extended family members who want to offer support, resulting in extra stress and trauma for everyone involved.

Substance withdrawal management is also provided. Currently, there are limited bed-based detox services on the Western Slope. Individuals needing to detox safely may come to the CWC for assessment. If the on-site medical providers determine that hospitalization isn’t warranted, outpatient detox therapies will be administered on-site where family members and friends are a welcome part of the treatment process.

The opening of the Crisis Walk-In Center will help law enforcement and first responders by giving them a valuable local resource. Currently, when first responders come across an individual exhibiting unusual behavior, they often have to choose between going to the emergency department or jail. Neither may be the appropriate location when someone is in crisis. “The staff has taken great strides in bridging the gap in immediate care and response for our citizens,” said detective Phil Rosty of the Montrose Police Department. “We are currently partnering police officers across the region with mental health professionals to ensure we provide the best service to those in need. As first responders, this resource provides a specialized and valuable resource for our responding officers when helping those in crisis.”

The CWC employs about 30 people. It has crisis stabilization and observation beds and can treat approximately 14-16 people at any given time. “After extensive due diligence, we discovered a need for a facility of this kind was dire,” said Kjersten Davis. “After we raised more than $3 million through public and private funding, we were able to create a place where our citizens can access quality behavioral health services available for people of all ages and walks of life, void of barriers, physical, cultural, or financial. We are thankful that the final stage is complete.”

The Center for Mental Health is a nonprofit organization seeking to promote mental health and well-being. It provides behavioral healthcare services through more than ten facilities across 10,000 square miles including Delta, Gunnison, Hinsdale, Montrose, Ouray, and San Miguel Counties. Visit www.centermh.org to learn more.

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